Teen sensation Jenny Shimamoto’s advice for kids trying to become viral stars

Jenny Shimamoto hit it big with the most popular video on TikTok this year — and the smash hit singer, who went viral as “Jenny from the block,” now has more than 26 million…

Teen sensation Jenny Shimamoto's advice for kids trying to become viral stars

Jenny Shimamoto hit it big with the most popular video on TikTok this year — and the smash hit singer, who went viral as “Jenny from the block,” now has more than 26 million followers on the popular video streaming app.

That number is why she was invited to appear on this week’s edition of “The View.”

At 17, she’s had nearly two years’ worth of fame — the most for any 18-year-old singer on the app. But Shimamoto just smiled and wasn’t able to say much more than “I love you guys” while appearing on the daytime talk show.

She was recently invited to perform at a Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles charity event — and the word got out about the teen before the gig.

There have been no shortage of crazy things going on around Jenny Shimamoto lately — like an alleged battle of words with video star “DaydayDay.” In April, the two appeared on TV cooking reality series “Chopped: Network Tastemakers.”

Like many other emerging performers, Jenny Shimamoto has been part of several viral YouTube hits. She’s also starred in VH1’s reality show “Behind the Music.”

Right now, Jina Watanabe, a teen American singer who signed with Universal Music last year, has the most popular TikTok song — and she can’t even sing.

Watanabe “snapped” to fame — and her preternatural good looks — after appearing on “American Idol” in 2013. She was drafted for “The Voice” when it first started in 2016. But Watanabe couldn’t seem to overcome her look — even on TV. Watanabe had the unenviable task of watching Maroon 5’s Adam Levine flaunt his washboard abs and Ryan Seacrest reject several contestants trying to make the mark on his show.

After four seasons on “The Voice,” Watanabe departed. She released her first single “Reversible.”

And in July, she released her second single “Paradise” on TikTok.

The unusual decision to make their music available on the app was a no-brainer for Watanabe and many other young talents: the network has been a tremendous boon for these artists.

Dr. Elizabeth Nolan Brown, a clinical psychologist and author of “The Luxury of Being a Teen,” says she doesn’t think the platform is responsible for driving recent behaviors such as lip-syncing.

Instead, she says, most young people will “go on Instagram and then go somewhere else, but that’s not the question.”

She also wonders if viewers are “convening with other influencers who are friends on Instagram and others who have already fallen in love with them or who are really the same demographic, but perhaps appeal to the same demographic … And so the app just becomes this validation from a one-stop shop for their social media.”

Watanabe’s also been in the headlines after a dispute with DaydayDay, a former YouTuber. Watanabe recently spoke out against the rival T-shirt maker, accusing him of “killing the girl (whose) career,” on Twitter.

DaydayDay took to Twitter in response, apologizing to his fans and vowing to “flatter her and be her friend.”

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