#gowalkabout architecture: Family inspires Student Award winner

Media playback is not supported on this device Olympic stars-turned-designers detail their work You might say that AnnaKathrynson Architecture is a family affair. Part of the architecture firm’s design team and a jury member…

#gowalkabout architecture: Family inspires Student Award winner

Media playback is not supported on this device Olympic stars-turned-designers detail their work

You might say that AnnaKathrynson Architecture is a family affair.

Part of the architecture firm’s design team and a jury member for the the Skott Student Award 2019, her mum Katrina Olsen has been designing houses since the 1970s.

Anna herself says that we are increasingly seeing several generations working together on the development of the built environment.

“I grew up in an environment where my father’s design insights were the common thread,” she says.

She notes that design inspiration can come from many sources, including Twitter.

“It is almost impossible to avoid a flood of design thinking on social media sites such as Twitter when you are at school or the office.

“It can help to share thoughts on the state of contemporary building in Europe, the performance of urbanism, contemporary ideas around light and the environment or simply the solution to a problem or opportunity.”

The judges of the Skott Student Award 2019 also highlighted how technology has changed the way people design and ultimately live their lives.

Traditionally, architects and designers took inspiration from nature and indigenous systems; now their experience is more of a computer-induced ‘knitted’ experience where information and trends are taught by feeding data into software.

“Having a built environment inside is like every other living thing, it should reflect the psychological and physical nature of the inhabitants,” says Anna.

“The product/objects designers are using plastic, fabric and other durable materials, not the traditional clay or mud. The technology enables us to make things that we never could have dreamed of until now. This rich and diverse resource contributes to our understanding of how things work and are used.”

As we all know, sometimes you have to make the furniture in the studio and the furniture has to go in the small converted studio unit in the living room, but you could just as easily use some of this mid-century, classic furniture in the studio bedroom.

Looking forward to the future, Anna predicts that online research will continue to mature, and give rise to a greater number of primary designer-makers and small-scale DIY merchants.

“Currently people do their research online and many of them remain home-based,” she says.

“But we might see a rise in the number of professional designers looking at projects, especially for one-off projects, who visit live prototypes in the studio where they can try things out and acquire ideas.

“In the future there will be an increase in the number of ideas generated in a virtual space, but real-life prototypes are becoming more and more important as well.

“The technology has to be there for us to re-create on the real space and that will require more collaboration.”

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