Gathering reader faves: The donut books we

Skip Warhol’s crazy latex gowns and eat a donut instead with our favorite donut books. “Montana Poets ’60s” by Lydia Tormé : MONROGRAMP; Atlas Obscura: A Lost World, Every Room in It : Donut…

Gathering reader faves: The donut books we

Skip Warhol’s crazy latex gowns and eat a donut instead with our favorite donut books.

“Montana Poets ’60s” by Lydia Tormé

: MONROGRAMP;

Atlas Obscura: A Lost World, Every Room in It

: Donut books:

HANDS

: BIRTHRIGHT:

The best of the best, from a hobby story and a drive-in tragedy to recipes and icons. Recommended by the inventor.

BONUS

: “Introduction to Donuts” by Sherri LaVette-Cook

: A chef, a baker, and a caffeine junkie all get together to talk bacon, donuts, and what’s really important to doughnuts.

BONUS

Post bimonthly food blog Tonic grub grub, like foodie be careful if this hits your lineup. Who knew we could share so much knowledge with so few words?

— Sam Lawrence, Washington Post staff

Snickers, Honey Buttermilk Biscuits, Chocolate Pretzel Grits. Again.

Reader Response: When I’m Not Liking a Recipe, My Friends Say I’m Liking the Recipe Because I’m Not Liking The Recipe

by Trish Wilcox

While I appreciate food that doesn’t sacrifice flavor, style, and presentation for reduction, I am in no way impressed by dishes made with canned orange juice. I mean, but it wasn’t that long ago when we all relied on it to drown spinach, which was delicious, but didn’t leave our nutrients intact.

But can I totally live without Trader Joe’s product? I haven’t had it in a while, but after I saw its recipe, I know I’m getting spoiled and it’ll probably be gone. There is one positive the can always brings when they send back products: It means new products to try and try again. I know I can do without it this summer, but I can see it being a life saver in winter.

— Michelle Silber, new at Grub Street

I stopped by a middle-aged woman’s house recently after she returned from grocery shopping and cooking a bunch of meals. She suggested that I look into her recipe for Caramel Creme Eggs for her own daughter’s party (I have an elder daughter). My daughter and I did some quick measurements and measured out the ingredients, and all the eggs (organic, I’d like to add). She was then somewhat disappointed when the party started (it didn’t look so hot), but when she gave out the homemade gold stars, one classmate said, “Awesome! Can’t get better than that.” So, like I said, I can’t get worse than that.

— Michele Mickosolo, Crossword editor

Three states — Connecticut, New York, and Texas — have distinct celebratory and sourdough wheat bagels, which makes finding a bagel in each state confusing.

My best tip for purchasing and creating your own New York City bagels is to get them from Second Empire Baking Company, which started up in 1911 in Harlem. Each bagel is made with a house-made sourdough bread dough, a blue-veined pumpernickel, and is baked and baked again. This helps the bread to crisp a lot and makes it last longer. The recipes are easy to make, but the bagels are pretty addictive.

— Gael Greene, food editor

Kamakura chocolate croissants.

Reader Response: When I’m Not Liking a Recipe, My Friends Say I’m Liking the Recipe Because I’m Not Liking the Recipe Because I’m Not Liking The Recipe

by Miah Jacobson

I’ve had it with food photo contests. So I decided to register some thoughts on the posts as a reader instead. When I’m not liking a recipe, my friends say I’m liking the recipe because I’m not liking the recipe because I’m not liking the recipe. But you can’t just flick “like” over anything, especially if you’re just doing an image-posting contest. You have to learn what makes those particular things special or someone else does too.

Here’s what my writing suggests: give me more food and I’ll give you people to ‘like’. In this case, my preference is eating croissants from The Girl’s Kitchen. They are moist, rich, and ridiculously delicious.

— Beverly Gage, author of “Eat Salt, Baby! Famous Food Writers and Their Hacks”

I’ll never find a better zucchini gratin recipe — by Paige Pearlman

What they sell in grocery stores now in California. More generous. And gluten-free.

— Mallory Ortberg, “First We Feast”

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to

Leave a Comment