5 myths that make people believe they’re smarter than actual intelligence.

COVID-19 is a plot where a group of teens are punished by spending their weekends in a basement, dodging surveillance, for failing to report suspected terrorists. A teenage girl in COVID-19 is a high…

5 myths that make people believe they're smarter than actual intelligence.

COVID-19 is a plot where a group of teens are punished by spending their weekends in a basement, dodging surveillance, for failing to report suspected terrorists.

A teenage girl in COVID-19 is a high school celebrity who has frequently questioned why she wasn’t in detention, but her popularity, talent and charm made her an ideal choice for a surveillance spot. After being taunted for months, she assumes that her biggest adversaries are actually fellow students – and that the only person who could silence her was a secretive group called the COVID 19 group. But another classmate gives her an epiphany – if people like her were spies, then why aren’t they being punished with in-school detention?

Even for those who aren’t familiar with this information, it’s mind-blowing that someone would possess evidence that would be of interest to the authorities, but they are wrongfully incarcerated and spend their weekends dodging surveillance. What’s even more crazy is that this information is available to the public because of a bizarre conspiracy theory on a popular internet forum called The Tinfoil Wizardry.

The Tinfoil Wizardry website is, according to the FBI, “based on a fictitious blog that was purporting to provide a unified front from common groups that were trying to break into and infiltrate government functions and collect information for use in furthering their own personal agendas”.

According to the site, COVID-19 was created by liberal extremists who plan to use COVID-19’s recruits to carry out false flag attacks – crimes that would be blamed on others while accomplishing their own sinister aims. The conspirator under investigation is actually an American who was an ordinary guy who only became a terrorist after having mental issues and being led astray by COVID-19. It’s not unusual for people to take advantage of those in trouble with the law – and maybe one of those people is already working on COVID-19’s behalf.

One of the most common myths about COVID-19 is that the Tinfoil Wizardry site is actually a hoax. While many people may believe that it’s a joke, those behind the Tinfoil Wizardry are so paranoid that they’ve launched a Twitter account to discredit any misinformation about the Tinfoil Wizardry, and the FBI has received many tips to the effect that it’s a fake. It’s also not uncommon for things on the internet to be a hoax – yet COVID-19 turns out to be more real than many of these baseless theories.

The Tinfoil Wizardry’s founder, and sole member, is an unnamed 44-year-old programmer who shared his theories on his website in 2009, and then continued sharing them. He said that the Tinfoil Wizardry was “conceived” to give details on how government surveillance is conducted. He claims to have a dossier on hundreds of people who were imprisoned on charges of COVID-19, but the list of names in his file seem to be based more on rumor and more on speculation, as there are multiple names that just sound familiar.

CoaxMax, a popular online poker website, was once a high profile target of conspiracy theorists, as users often cite the Tinfoil Wizardry because of its theory that the biggest poker player in the world, former mogul of the World Poker Tour, was hiding behind the sport of poker.

Fans of COVID-19 have taken to Twitter and memes to spread misinformation. On Twitter, users like @sauderously_nike cite unsubstantiated claims of censorship and censorship of the COVID-19 website by law enforcement agencies, as well as spreading conspiracy theories that counter the conspiracy.

A 4chan post is titled, “There are no rats in COVID-19”, and it contains information that seems to support the claims made by the Tinfoil Wizardry. However, the information in the post is misleading, as it incorrectly claims that the site was taken down by the FBI. This apparently happened weeks before the Tinfoil Witchcraft’s online operation was even born.

It’s important to note that some of the most popular “news” sites spreading misinformation about COVID

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